Cloisonne Ware

Cloisonne ware has a long history, originating in ancient Egypt around 1360 BC.
It has been used in the golden mask of King Tutankhamun.
It is said that cloisonne ware was introduced to Europe and China, and then to Japan later.
In Japan, cloisonne ware became a national treasure and used by the imperial family because of its beautiful manufacturing process.
In the latter half of the Showa period (1926-1989), there was a cloisonne ware trend, and it became a traditional craft loved by a wide range of people.
While inheriting the traditional history and dignity of cloisonne enamelware, kimito expresses the good old things in a new way by fusing them with more catchy tastes.

The Concept of "kimito"

The charm of the cloisonne ware technique itself is brought out by instantly expressing what I feel.

The definition of cloisonne enamelware is "a glassy glaze baked on a metal plate.”
I believe that the charm of the cloisonne enamelware technique itself is brought out by instantly expressing what one feels, rather than following a manual process according to a finished drawing. Therefore, the finished product has a very spontaneous element to it, which is perfect for my personality, and less inclined to be creative if the finished product has a certain shape. It is as if a space for cloisonne enamelware had existed in my body from the beginning now.

Since cloisonne enamelware is a traditional technique, many artists follow a traditional way of making things, but I believe that because it is a traditional craft, it is necessary to think of cloisonne enamel ware as a tool to maximize one's individuality and express oneself freely.

While it is essential to improve one's technique in the process of making things, I place more importance on my sensibility and view of life that I put into my works, and I try to create a world that only I can express.

ABOUT "MITO UEKI" - Designer -

Mito Ueki / Cloisonne Designer
Born in Tokyo, 1990

Ueki was educated in calligraphy by her parents, calligraphers, from an early age.
At the age of 16, she encountered cloisonne enamelware and was strongly attracted by its infinite range of expression and the tension of betting on one shot.

2009
Participated in Omotesando group exhibition
Solo exhibition at Kokubunji
Participated in the New Year's event at Akasaka Prince Hotel

2010
Solo exhibition at Jiyugaoka
Awarded the Youngest Encouragement Prize at the Japan Cloisonne Enamel Art Instructors Association Exhibition

2010
Solo exhibition at Jiyugaoka
Awarded the Youngest Encouragement Prize at the Japan Cloisonne Enamel Art Instructors Association Exhibition

2011
Studied in Germany for one year
Participated in an art event in Kelkheim
Participated in a group exhibition in Berlin

2012
Held a solo exhibition in Nakameguro, Tokyo in 2012.
Awarded the Encouragement Prize at the Japan Cloisonne Enamel Art Instructors Association Exhibition

2013
Participated in the New Year's event at the Imperial Hotel as a cloisonne enamelware instructor.

The Reason for Working

I want to make cloisonne ware freer.
That is my wish as a cloisonne ware lover.

In this day and age, when the criteria for choosing good and bad things are inevitably influenced by information transmitted by the popular media, things that are considered good by the majority certainly have a sense of security and authenticity. However, I think it would be an irreplaceable joy to share your life with something that you have found and chosen based on your sensibilities, leaving aside such worldly considerations.

My works are made by combining existing cloisonne enamelware techniques in various ways.When you get down to the nitty-gritty of cloisonne enamelware, what ultimately remains are “metal and glass.”
When confronted with the beauty of materials that have been honed to the ultimate level, the most important thing is a flexible mind and an inquisitive spirit that accepts change. The joy of being the first to see the work that results from this process. That moment is the true joy of being an artist.
I have a strong desire to pass on traditional techniques. At the same time, I want to make cloisonne enamelware freer. That is my wish as a lover of cloisonne enamelware.

Thanks to cloisonne enamelware, I have been able to encounter a spirit of creative inquiry and a sense of independence that defines me. Next, I would like to create a chance for everyone to encounter something important through my creations. I am immersed in my work, dreaming of such happiness.

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